Category Archives: auditions

We’ve Got Two Babes

DreamWrights has had a long history of double casting. Twenty years of it, in fact. This has provided for more involvement and educational opportunities. And more fun. Traditionally, the two actors cast for the same role were very similar. Comparable in size, shape, look, and style. Hilary Adams, Director for Babe the Sheep-Pig, decided to mix things up and choose two very contrasting young actors to play the lead character of Babe. Ten year old Natalie Doran and twelve year old Noah Youcheff are distinctive in many ways: height, gender, style, but both had something that caught director, Hilary Adams’ attention. She explains, “I looked for poise, confidence, and natural ability to interpret text and find meaning. She also had the sense that they would be able to carry the show since they are on stage for practically the entire production. “That’s a lot of stage time to handle effectively for any age.”

Hilary is anticipating the uniqueness that each Babe brings to his/her show. “They both have wonderfully unique, inventive versions of the character of Babe. They are very different actors, and thus their “Babes” are both quite different from each other. That’s one of the really fun things to witness: two very different, equally effective, interpretations of a character in action!”

Both Noah and Natalie were eager to be chosen to be Babe, and even more thrilling for them was that their friend was chosen to be their “other.” The two had become pals while working together on The Wizard of Oz. Natalie remembers, “When I found out I was chosen to be Babe, I was super excited because this is only my second show at DreamWrights and I thought I wasn’t going to get a part this big. I was really happy for Noah and excited to find out he was chosen as the other Babe. I thought it was crazy…” Noah interrupts, “…because we were just joking about it during auditions! I was really happy too.”

Even at their young ages, these two are learning more than the challenging blocking. They are learning the life lesson woven through the story of Babe. Natalie explains, “The show itself has taught me that it really doesn’t matter what you are, you can be whatever you really want to be if you try hard enough.” Noah agrees, “Yes, you can be anything you want. That’s a strong lesson that people need to know. Babe is very realistic story, other than animals talking. A pig could actually herd sheep… It could!” Natalie laughs in agreement, “Yeah, it could happen with them talking animal language. But yeah, it could.”

Come to the DreamWrights farm show, Babe the Sheep-Pig, which opens Friday, February 10 and runs February 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, and 25 at 6:30 pm and February 11, 12, 19, and 26 at 2:30 pm. Tickets may be purchased online or by calling 717-848-8623. Advance seats cost $10 for general, $14 for reserved. General admission seats at the door cost $12.

 

Directors’ Advice: Audition Etiquette

With auditions for The Secret Garden just around the corner, DreamWrighters turned to our resident director as well as a few of our recent guest directors for some advice. Here is the second installment of wisdom and guidance on the topic of Audition Etiquette.

DreamWrighters: Thanks for taking a few moments to share your advice and experiences with our audience. Hopefully this advice will benefit new actors, experienced actors, as well as directors. As a director, Can you give us a few pointers on audition etiquette? What to do? What not to do?

Auditions

Paige Hoke: For me, the biggest “do’s” are being as nice, outgoing, confident, and prepared as possible. Act this way from the moment you enter the door to the moment you leave because directors and audition helpers do talk to each other and directors tend to be super observant. <wink>  Most directors look not only for talent, but for people they want to work with!

Also, make sure you say thank you after your audition! Always try to read the play or musical, or at least a synopsis, beforehand. This helps a lot if you are not given materials to use ahead of time. But if you are given materials beforehand, practice them a lot and be comfortable with them!

As far as don’ts…. don’t hide any conflicts you have, and don’t apologize or make excuses if you do mess up! Just keep going and recover from the mistake. 🙂

Rodd Robertson

Rodd Robertson: Have fun with it.  If you are nervous it will translate to the audition panel.  Someone who is having fun, is relaxed and handles any audition situation with poise will be remembered as someone with whom directors will want to work. Roll with the process.

Diane Crews: Dress comfortably and appropriately.  You need to be able to move freely.  No high heels, tight/short skirts/pants, not a lot of skin, and please don’t dress like the character you want to play.  The latter will usually be a negative for a director.  Casting is the director’s job! Be yourself … have energy … project … if asked to read different characters, make sure there is a difference.

Kirk Wisler: Be professional, listen to the panel, have your phone off, not doing this could really hurt you. Don’t give the audition panel any reason not to cast you. Have good eye contact with people in scene.

Michelle Denise Norton: Listen.  Be nice to other people.  Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you don’t understand.  Be yourself, which may seem counterintuitive but actually works.

About the Directors

Diane Crews: Artistic Director and Playwright-in-Residence at DreamWrights Youth & Family Theatre. Diane is currently directing The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Having directed well over one hundred shows at DreamWrights, Pageant will be her last holiday production as she is set to retire in the Fall of 2016.

Paige Hoke: Paige Hoke is 2010 graduate of Arcadia University’s BFA in Acting Program. She has experience directing, teaching, and acting in the York and Philadelphia areas. She most recently directed Seussical at DreamWrights.

Michelle Denise Norton: Founder and Director of DreamWrights’ Theatre Under The Trees program.  Along with all of her theatrical endeavors, Michelle is also a writer, artist and cartoonist.  In Summer 2016, Theatre Under The Trees will be bringing As You Like It to local parks

Rodd Robertson: Director and actor, Rodd lists “Leo” from Leading Ladies and “Prof. Koknitz” from The Mouse That Roared as two favorite of his favorite roles.  He has directed a handful of productions including To See the Stars and Nancy Drew: Girl Detective at DreamWrights and elsewhere.

Kirk Wisler: Kirk made his directorial debut at DreamWrights this past summer, directing The Mouse that Roared. He has taken part in over thirty plays from 2001 until the present day. He hopes to continue directing and acting at DreamWrights for many more years to come.

All in the Family

Any time of year is a wonderful time to get involved with your family at DreamWrights Youth & Family Theatre. However, a holiday show at DreamWrights with your family is extra special. A handful of families participate in the theatre as a complete (or nearly complete) family.  Because they love it so much, they keep coming back for more.

Natalie Smith as Grace Bradley, center in navy
Natalie Smith as Mrs. Grace Bradley, center in navy.

Natalie Smith and her three children have done three shows at DreamWrights including The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, which is currently running. After living abroad for many years, Natalie looked for something to help her family get oriented with their new community when they moved into the area. Natalie explains, “DreamWrights offers a place for all of us to feel welcome and connected. The people involved with this theatre are so friendly and family-focused. It’s a fun way to spend quality family time together and the holiday show definitely puts us in the holiday spirit!”

Andrea Unger, far left as Mrs. Irma Slocum. Her husband, David Unger, center as Reverend Hopkins
Andrea Unger, far left as Mrs. Irma Slocum. Her husband, David Unger, center as Reverend Hopkins.

Andrea Unger, her husband, and her youngest son have participated in ten DreamWrights shows together, including The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. “Since we are a small family (our two oldest boys are out of state as are our other relatives) being in the Christmas shows has been like celebrating the holidays with an extended family,” she jokes, “…one that you actually like and want to spend time with!”

Natalie says there are many perks to participating together as a family. “It gives us some fun conversation topics at home. We all enjoy meeting new people at DreamWrights and also seeing other families we’ve been with before.” Andrea’s son, Jonah explains, “Being together gives me an opportunity to talk over the play with my family, to receive critiques and suggestions….and also to give them.”

Jonah Unger
Jonah and Dave Unger on stage together.

After rehearsals and the performances the Ungers pile in the car and go over the show in detail, all the way home. They discuss any mishaps that may have occurred, (Andrea discloses, “Live theatre! Yes, it happens!”) talk about audience reactions, as well as things upon which they could change or improve.  “We talk and laugh and tweak all through the run of the show,” Andrea reveals. Over the course of the shows in which the Ungers have been involved, they have developed some family traditions:  Handel’s for ice cream after auditions, recording the script to help with memorizing lines, and giving little surprises to each other instead of flowers after the last performance, to mention a few.

All three of Natalie Smith's children perform in the play along with her.
All three of Natalie Smith’s children perform in the play along with her.

Natalie loves having the opportunity to participate in activities like live theatre with her children. “I hope someday they will look back on this experience and want to participate in activities like this with their own children.” Andrea gets right to a big reason why DreamWrights is special. “While we participate in theatre as a family, we do this at Jonah’s lead; theater is where he wants to be. DreamWrights has made it possible for us to do this together.  I don’t know of any other theatre that considers the entire family during the selection process.”

To see how much fun the Smiths and the Ungers are having this holiday season, join us for a performance of the The Best Christmas Pageant Ever on December 11, 12, 18 & 19 – 6:30 pm or December 12, 13, 19 & 20 – 2:30 pm. Then bring yourself (or even better –  the whole family) to audition for The Secret Garden on December 15 or 16 at 6pm.  Visit dreamwrights.org for more information.

Directors’ Advice: Character Development

DreamWrighters recently caught up with our resident artistic director as well as a few recent guest directors for some advice. Here is the first installment of wisdom and guidance from these esteemed directors. Today’s question is on the topic of Character Development.

DreamWrighters: Thanks for taking a few moments to share your advice and experiences with our audience. Hopefully this advice will benefit new actors, experienced actors, as well as directors. As a director, how do you inspire and motivate an actor to embody his/her character?

Diane as a duck

Diane Crews: It is the actor’s job to find out as much as they can about their character.  The script offers a good deal of information via what you say, what other say about you, and to you. I often supply a character questionnaire, which encourages the actors to delve deeper and create some back story for their character as well.  They need to know how the character is different and the same as they are, and what they want and how they think.  I find asking questions that allow the actor to ‘think’ is the best and most helpful tool.

Paige Hoke: Think about what your character wants in a scene and in the overall show. Does it change? How does your character try to achieve their wants? Do they achieve what they want? What do other characters say about your character? What do you say about yourself? Who are your character’s friends, enemies, family members? How does your character feel about the other people in the world of the play/musical? Observe people in real life. See how they move and interact with each other.

Michelle Directing

Michelle Denise Norton: First, I start with a good script — that’s the foundation of everything. Then I tell actors: learn your lines.  Listen to the other characters on stage and what they are saying about your character.  Try to see the director’s overall vision and then find ways specific to your character that you can add depth to that vision.

rodd 2

Rodd Robertson:  I ask the actors to think about whom their character is; how does he/she walk, talk, look? Then, I ask them to consider how they are portraying that character.  Is their portrayal a portrait of the actor’s mannerisms, speech patterns, or look?  If they’re just walking through a scene as themselves and aren’t trying to transform themselves into their character, I ask them to stop and change things.  If they can’t come up with anything, I’ll help them work it out.  I don’t want to see Johnny Depp up on that stage; I want to see Captain Jack.  And, I praise the heck out of them each step of the way during their transformation. Praise and encouragement is a powerful motivator.

IMG_4113

Kirk Wisler: Positive reinforcement. Build up your actors. For every negative give them two positives.  Keep open lines of communication.

 

 

About the Directors
Diane Crews: Artistic Director and Playwright-in-Residence at DreamWrights Youth & Family Theatre. Diane is currently directing The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Having directed well over one hundred shows at DreamWrights, Pageant will be her last holiday production as she plans to retire in the Fall of 2016.

Paige Hoke: Paige Hoke is 2010 graduate of Arcadia University’s BFA in Acting Program. She has experience directing, teaching, and acting in the York and Philadelphia areas. She most recently directed Seussical at DreamWrights.

Michelle Denise Norton: Founder and Director of DreamWrights’ Theatre Under The Trees program.  Along with all of her theatrical endeavors, Michelle is also a writer, artist and cartoonist.  In Summer 2016, Theatre Under The Trees will be bringing As You Like It to local parks

Rodd Robertson: Director and actor, Rodd lists “Leo” from Leading Ladies and “Prof. Koknitz” from The Mouse That Roared as two of his favorite roles.  He has directed a handful of productions including To See the Stars and Nancy Drew: Girl Detective at DreamWrights and elsewhere.

Kirk Wisler: Kirk made his directorial debut at DreamWrights this past summer directing The Mouse that Roared. He has taken part in over thirty plays from 2001 until the present day. He hopes to continue directing and acting at DreamWrights for many more years to come.

If At First You Don’t Succeed: A Case Study

Hannah began taking camps and classes at DreamWrights at the age of 5. Theatre was in her blood, even at this young age. She could hardly wait until she was old enough to try out for a production. When she realized the first show she would be old enough to be in was Snow White, she was over the moon. It was one of her favorites and she knew she was destined to be in it. So, Hannah tried out and anxiously waited for “the call.” But when “the call” never came, the reality was devastating. She was not chosen to be in Snow White. Hannah was crushed.

Annie

But, young Hannah did something that is often hard even for adults to do. She pulled herself back up, set her sights on the next show, and tried out again. This time it was Annie and this time she made it. It was a great experience and Hannah confirmed her love for the theatre.

However, her story doesn’t end there. With one show under her belt, Hannah was ready for her next. It was another favorite, Beauty and the Beast. Again, the perfect moment. She was a shoe-in! But then she didn’t get in. And again, it was quite a blow for Hannah, especially since one of her best friends had made it. Maybe the next show, Sleepy Hollow? Didn’t work out. Or the next, Miracle on 34thStreet? Nope.

DSC_6687

During this time, Hannah’s mom continued to provide encouragement. She registered Hannah for production camps and theatre classes to keep her involved and doing what she loved while gaining experience. Although she surely had moments of doubt, young Hannah persevered and went for it again with Alice in Wonderland. She got in! In fact, then she had a good run of two more shows after Alice, Dr. Doolittle and The Hobbit.

DSC_4973

Through all of this, Hannah did what directors hope all unsuccessful auditionees will do. Remember what Guest Director Paige Hoke reminds us of in her recent blog? For the shows where Hannah wasn’t chosen, maybe she didn’t fit into the overall puzzle. But, she kept at it. She didn’t get resentful, she didn’t give up; she became determined and kept plugging along.

Certainly, Hannah’s experience  isn’t uncommon. The way she handled it, kept a positive attitude, and persevered could possibly be.  And what wonderful life lessons this young lady has already learned. Often, things don’t come easily to us in life.  Even before the age of 10, Hannah knew as well as anyone how to overcome, persevere, and believe in herself. The world is her oyster.

Auditions Ahead Beware …What You Say! Versus What is Heard!

Over the years I have heard the following statements said in a variety of ways:
1) There’s nothing for me in that show.
2) That’s a show for boys.
3) That’s a girls’ show.
4) That’s a children’s show.
The translation, to me, is you don’t know the story or DreamWrights or both.

DW_2015Season_Inside

One of the first things you learn in college is to read the script, if you can, before you go to an audition. That is not always possible, but if it is an adaptation you can always read the story. Our next two shows are classics so they should be easy to find.The Best Christmas Pageant Ever is written by Barbara Robinson. It’s a wonderful book and the script is very close to the original. The Secret Garden, by Francis Hodgson Burnett is another easy to find story. Our script was adapted for the stage by Paige Hoke. I wrote Young King Arthur from a myriad of Arthurian legends so there is no one story to access, but scripts will be available to check out two weeks prior to auditions.

You may not know that DreamWrights has a play reading committee that works hard each year reading many scripts in the search of plays that best suit our theatre. Isn’t our theatre like all others? Not at all! First we are a Youth & Family Theatre. Children’s Theatre is theatre for children performed by adults. Youth theatre is theatre for all ages performed by young people. A youth & family theatre is for all ages performed by all ages.

Being a multigenerational theatre means we are always looking for shows that have legitimate parts for children, teens and adults. (A legitimate part means that each character has a name/lines/and is needed. Not just onstage to decorate the set.) Plus, we need large casts. Trust me, there are not that many good published scripts that fit into either, let alone both categories. So the committee has a daunting task! In addition, they are always striving for a balanced season, which is yet another challenge. Is there something to interest everyone both artists and audience? Is there variety in time periods, topics, genres, etc.?

Dreamwrights’ four main shows are different in yet another way. We double cast! Why? The reasons are many, but the main one is we always audition over one hundred and fifty hopefuls per show. A good audition in ‘regular’ (whatever that is) community based theatre is between thirty to fifty.

Now onto this boy girl thing. We would never select a script that didn’t have a fairly equal number of all ages and genders. You can not go by a title. Please see the breakdown below of our next three shows as a perfect example of what we always hope for.

Yes, there are always some characters that have more lines than others. But we are an ensemble (Webster: A group of complementary parts contributing to a single piece.) theatre. We work together to tell the story. And it’s not about the lines! It’s about the character, and how you bring it to life.

Now about this, ‘there’s no part for me’ business. You are doing two things wrong here with this line of thinking. First, you are limiting yourself incredibly. Second, you are doing the director’s job. If you can’t trust the director to cast you … don’t audition for them.

Best Christmas                  Secret Garden                  Young King Arthur

Women                             6                                            4                                                   7
Men                                    5                                            4                                                   7
Teen W                              0                                            6                                                   6
Teen M                              4                                             6                                                   7
Girls                                   7                                             6                                                   6
Boys                                  7                                              5                                                   5
Total                                 39                                            31 (Playing 47)                       38

Diane Crews
Artistic Director

I Got In, But It’s Not the Part I Wanted: Why You Should Embrace the Part You Got

Seussical has been cast, and the calls have been made. If you didn’t get in this time, please take a moment to read my previous blog, and make sure you keep auditioning!!

I'm perfect for the part

As I finished casting Seussical, I found myself reflecting on another topic I have struggled with in the past. What happens when you get into a show, but you don’t get the part you wanted? And more importantly, what are some reasons WHY that happens.

I’ve definitely been there. In high school, I was lucky enough to have our Director choose my favorite show of all time. In that show there was a part that I was DYING to play. It was my dream role. Well, the cast list went up, and I didn’t get that part. Even though I had gotten another role, I was quite upset.  I was crushed. I was in disbelief. I didn’t understand why this had happened when I knew I was so perfect for the role.

I didn't get the part I wanted but my sister did

But now that I am a Director, I know why. And, in fact, there is a very good reason. Casting a show is like fitting together a giant puzzle. All the pieces, with all their different facets, have to line up to make one beautiful work of art which we present to our audiences.

As actors, I think we are often limited by our own perceptions of ourselves. We think we know what roles are right for us, and we get really attached to them. We tend to call these our “dream roles.” And when a show comes around that has that “dream role,” we, of course, audition. We think the director would be crazy not to cast us in that role because we are just so perfect for it. But, when we get ourselves thinking like that, we are limiting ourselves to other possibilities. Maybe this Director thinks that we would be perfect in a different role, based on their vision and their perception of us actors and on their vision and perception of the show as a whole.

I love my part after all

You might argue that they are judging you unfairly, that they are the limited ones. But, I challenge you to think about this differently. What if the Director sees something in you that you don’t? Couldn’t it be fun to see what different people think you are capable of?! Maybe you never thought you could play a love interest, and that’s what they see you as being. And isn’t that fascinating and exciting? Let yourself be stretched in ways you didn’t think of.

But then there are times when the Director thinks you actually would be perfect to play your dream role; however, there may be two other people that can play it equally as well. And, what if those two others would not be as good in a different role as you would. Remember that puzzle metaphor? Sometimes our puzzle piece just doesn’t fit right for our dream roles in this particular puzzle. In another show, it could fit beautifully where you want it, but in this one, maybe it fits better somewhere else.

What a great experience

I’m sure you’ve heard the expression, “there are no small parts, only small actors.” It really is true. Playwrights don’t write characters into plays or musicals if they don’t need them there to tell their story. Every character is important. Every character works together to tell the story the playwright set out to tell. Where would Dorothy be without the Wizard? A small part, but critical to the entire story!

So instead of being sad or resentful that you didn’t get the role you so badly wanted or thought you would get, embrace the role you did get! Throw yourself into it, have fun, and discover something new about yourself! After all, you get to do a show! You get to help tell a story. You get to perform in live theatre. Without you, the story we tell, or the puzzle the audience sees, just wouldn’t be the same.

Paige Hoke
Guest Director

I Wasn’t Good Enough:The Truth About Why You Didn’t Get the Part

On the eve of SEUSSICAL auditions and what promises to be the biggest talent pool from which I’ve ever chosen, I find myself to be a bit anxious. Being that I have had experiences on both sides of the stage, I understand all too well the feelings an actor has when she isn’t chosen for a part or show she has her heart set on. I think about the feelings that may be hurt or the misconceptions that some actors will leave with. I know some will be thinking, “I wasn’t good enough.” But what I wish they all could know is that’s almost always not the reason they weren’t chosen.

Auditions

As a director, I have a vision for the characters. It’s not so much about the “look” for me. It’s more about my overall vision for the show as a whole, as well as my vision for the individual characters. Lots of people have the talent it takes to be in a show, and lots of actors have a similar level of talent.  It comes down to a person’s look, energy, feel and how one actor plays off another actor. Lead characters often will “pop out” in the way that they fit into my vision. But, the whole ensemble has to gel. You can be the most talented person but if you don’t mesh with the whole show and the director’s vision of the show, then you may not be chosen.

Specific to the double casted shows, actors and their “others” need to be close in size. They often share costumes, props, and of course, are taught the same blocking and need to physically fill similar spaces. Other attributes that factor into casting decisions include schedule conflicts, confidence, stage presence, attitude, enthusiasm, and workability. Are you someone who seems like you could take direction well? Are you open minded and willing to listen to your director or do you seem like you already know all the answers?

I know as well as anyone that it can be hard to accept that you weren’t chosen. It can be frustrating and disappointing. So as you approach your audition for SEUSSICAL or for any show, please remember that if you don’t get the part, it isn’t because you don’t have the talent.  It doesn’t mean you weren’t good. Keep the faith and try again because no two shows are the same, and the same people will not always fit best for every show. Have you heard the saying, “Variety is the spice of life”? It’s true. You just might be the perfect fit at your next audition.

Break a Leg!
Paige Hoke
DreamWrights Guest Director

Four Tips for Nailing your Dance Audition

Grease Audition Team

So you are excited for the next DreamWrights show auditions, but you realize that there will be dancing and you are worried that the audition team and choreographer won’t like what they see.  Here are some tips about what your choreographer is looking for and how you can make the most out of your audition.

 

Choreographers want to see how you naturally move

Maybe you’ve never taken a dance class.  It doesn’t matter.  Even if you don’t know your pirouette from a grapevine, if you know how to shift your weight you’ll do fine for a DreamWrights show.  Come ready to dance.  If you aren’t dressed to dance it is a dead giveaway that you can’t or don’t care to.  Stay loose and just do your best to put your feet and hands where they should be on the appropriate beats.  Your natural instincts and reflexes should take over from there.

Choreographers are looking for how quickly you can learn the work

The audition starts the moment you start to learn the sample combination.  The quicker you can pick it up, the more valuable you’ll be as a performer.  Even if you don’t feel like you are naturally gifted at dancing, if you can demonstrate that you can remember what comes next you’ll have a huge advantage over performers who are tourists in the dancing portion of the audition.

Choreographers are looking for performers with poise

Choreographers know that everyone screws up every once and a while.  The faster you can get back into the combination after making a mistake the better.  Don’t wince or indicate any displeasure, and you might find that the audition team might not even know you made a mistake.

Choreographers are looking for performers who “make it a moment”

2015-07 Andrew Smith

When a choreographer says “make it a moment”, they mean that they want to see you be aggressive and stretch to reach each step to make it as big as possible.  Own the combination and actually perform it rather than just going through the motions.  Stick the beats, and extend energy away from your body like a superhero when you reach and point.  Be authentic and enthusiastic!  Don’t groan and look pained.  Overall, have fun and accept your dance audition as a new challenge.  If you approach it as a great opportunity rather than a chore, you’ll find that you can get the most out of your theatre experience.

Andrew Smith
IT Professional by day
Choreographer by night

 

You Could Be Part of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night

Summers are a busy time at DreamWrights.  The theatre is always bustling, with camps and shows nearly every daylight hour and many of the evening ones.  Theatre Under the Trees is my contribution to that activity and I’m very excited about this year’s show: Twelfth Night.  Twelfth Night tells the story of shipwrecked twins, focusing on Viola as she searches for a safe haven and falls in love with the Duke Orsino, who she has come to work for.  Viola finds herself disguised as a boy, running errands for Orsino, trying to convince the Lady Olivia that Olivia should listen to Orsino’s pleas of love, when Orsino’s love is what Viola wants to reserve for herself.  Once you mix in the other members of Olivia’s household:  her cousin, his gullible friend, the steward, servants and Feste, the fool, who sings both merry and melancholy tunes for both Lord and Lady, you get a play that catapults you from one silliness to the next.

Twelfth Night may well be my favorite of Shakespeare’s plays to direct.  The story is straightforward, there aren’t a lot of extraneous characters and the mischief and misunderstandings have so much comic potential.

If you aren’t familiar with Theatre Under The Trees, we are a touring show, taking our performances to local parks.  It’s really a wonderful way to spend a summer evening.

Auditions will be held Tuesday, May 26 and Wednesday, May 27 at 6:00 p.m.  Ages 7-Adult may audition, and there is no advance preparation required. We need actors, singers, musicians and crew. Performances will be held July 24th through August 2nd.  Check the DreamWrights website for locations.

Michelle Denise Norton

Founder and Director, Theatre Under The Trees