Category Archives: Shows

We’ve Got Two Babes

DreamWrights has had a long history of double casting. Twenty years of it, in fact. This has provided for more involvement and educational opportunities. And more fun. Traditionally, the two actors cast for the same role were very similar. Comparable in size, shape, look, and style. Hilary Adams, Director for Babe the Sheep-Pig, decided to mix things up and choose two very contrasting young actors to play the lead character of Babe. Ten year old Natalie Doran and twelve year old Noah Youcheff are distinctive in many ways: height, gender, style, but both had something that caught director, Hilary Adams’ attention. She explains, “I looked for poise, confidence, and natural ability to interpret text and find meaning. She also had the sense that they would be able to carry the show since they are on stage for practically the entire production. “That’s a lot of stage time to handle effectively for any age.”

Hilary is anticipating the uniqueness that each Babe brings to his/her show. “They both have wonderfully unique, inventive versions of the character of Babe. They are very different actors, and thus their “Babes” are both quite different from each other. That’s one of the really fun things to witness: two very different, equally effective, interpretations of a character in action!”

Both Noah and Natalie were eager to be chosen to be Babe, and even more thrilling for them was that their friend was chosen to be their “other.” The two had become pals while working together on The Wizard of Oz. Natalie remembers, “When I found out I was chosen to be Babe, I was super excited because this is only my second show at DreamWrights and I thought I wasn’t going to get a part this big. I was really happy for Noah and excited to find out he was chosen as the other Babe. I thought it was crazy…” Noah interrupts, “…because we were just joking about it during auditions! I was really happy too.”

Even at their young ages, these two are learning more than the challenging blocking. They are learning the life lesson woven through the story of Babe. Natalie explains, “The show itself has taught me that it really doesn’t matter what you are, you can be whatever you really want to be if you try hard enough.” Noah agrees, “Yes, you can be anything you want. That’s a strong lesson that people need to know. Babe is very realistic story, other than animals talking. A pig could actually herd sheep… It could!” Natalie laughs in agreement, “Yeah, it could happen with them talking animal language. But yeah, it could.”

Come to the DreamWrights farm show, Babe the Sheep-Pig, which opens Friday, February 10 and runs February 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, and 25 at 6:30 pm and February 11, 12, 19, and 26 at 2:30 pm. Tickets may be purchased online or by calling 717-848-8623. Advance seats cost $10 for general, $14 for reserved. General admission seats at the door cost $12.

 

Putting the polish on PSM

Jessica Crowe makes her living as a free-lance performance artist. She is used to performing in unique venues, from underwater-style theatres to big stages.  But Jessica has made a place for herself right here at DreamWrights. “The funny thing is, as a performance artist, I travel all over the country but DreamWrights is my favorite place to be. It’s really cool traveling but this is feels very much like home for me and it has helped York feel like home.”

In only her third production at DreamWrights, Jessica has found her passion behind the scenes. “I love the acting aspect of working on a production but as a Stage Manager you really get to work with the whole cast and the crew and you get to know everyone in the production. Whereas, as an actor, you’re really more involved with the people you’re specifically on stage with. I love being able to work with everybody.”

Jessica Crowe with Jaci Keagy

During The Wizard of Oz, Jessica became quite invaluable to director, Jaci Keagy. Jaci explains, “The most effective stage managers are those people who can see what needs to be done and just jump in and do it.  That was Jessica to a T.  She was especially strong during tech and when the show was running.  She was a good leader and kept her cool.  I felt fortunate to have her.”

This time around, Jessica is the Production Stage Manager (PSM) for Babe, the Sheep-Pig.  At DreamWrights, the PSM is the right hand to the director in a production. With her professional performance experience, and the lessons she’s learned at DreamWrights, Jessica shares her best advice for what makes an effective PSM:

  • Be Organized. “You have to be really organized with paperwork, be able to handle blocking, and be able to instruct your stage managers. Being PSM has helped to strengthen my organization skills.”
  • Listen. “Being able to listen and take direction really well are important because you have to pay attention to everything the director wants and make sure he/she has everything he/she needs to make the production a success.”
  • Be Flexible. “As the production grows, you have to be able to fit in where you’re needed and be able to make it a success. I’ve learned to take each moment for what it is and help out where I can.”

So as Babe opens this weekend and audiences sit back and enjoy the show, they’ll never know about the last minute mishaps or emergencies that may or may not be happening behind the scenes.  The show must go on, and Jessica Crowe will be there to make sure it does… successfully!

Babe Reminds Us that Anything is Possible

Left to right: Mark Evans, Andi Cooper, Sierra Noll, Makaela Cooper, Noah Youcheff, and Maddie Trimmer
Left to right: Mark Evans, Andi Cooper, Sierra Noll, Makaela Cooper, Noah Youcheff, and Maddie Trimmer

As Hilary Adams, Director of Artistic Programming prepares to stage, Babe, the Sheep-Pig, her very first show at DreamWrights, she reflects on the theme of the show and what she would like audiences to take away from it. Adams says, “I’d like people to feel uplifted by the central message of the show that you should not be limited by what the world thinks you can do. Trying new things, no matter your age, even if other people at first laugh at your attempts, is essential to continuing to grow as a person. Maybe, like Babe, you’ll discover a new talent or skill, or maybe you’ll make some new friends along the way.”

Discovering a new talent or skill? Making new friends along the way? Doing something you didn’t think was possible? This is what happens to people who enter the doors of DreamWrights. Babe, the Sheep-Pig reflects so many of the organization’s values.  Even the young actors recognize the life lessons that Babe teaches.  Thirteen year old Makaela Cooper and eleven year old Maddie Trimmer both play the part of sheep in the play. Makaela shares, “It doesn’t matter who you are or what you look like. You can be whoever you want and say it however you want and do whatever you want.  It is a message that both Babe and DreamWrights has taught me.”  Maddie agrees, “DreamWrights gives you opportunities that you never thought you could have. You can be a sheep one play and a princess the next one.” Noah Youcheff, 12, who plays the part of Babe says, “The show has taught me that you can be whatever you want to be if you try hard enough.”

People of all ages will find humor, excitement, and poignancy in the show. Adams invites audiences to come along on the adventure, “There are a lot of fun action scenes combined with touching moments of connection between the characters as we go with Babe on his journey from a new arrival on the farm, to his big day as the first pig to participate in the Grand Challenge Sheep-dog Trials.”

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As a special event, audiences are invited to visit with micro pigs, Dyna and Opal prior to many of the Babe performances.  Dyna is micro mini pig. At around 30lbs., she is on the smaller side as some of these pigs grow to be 150lbs. She loves kids and attention and snuggling with her humans. Opal is an 8 month old Juliana micro pig. She knows her name, walks on a leash, and knows some basic commands (sit, come , spin).

Come to the DreamWrights farm show, Babe the Sheep-Pig, which opens Friday, February 10 and runs February 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, and 25 at 6:30 pm and February 11, 12, 19, and 26 at 2:30 pm. Tickets may be purchased online or by calling 717-848-8623. Advance seats cost $10 for general, $14 for reserved. General admission seats at the door cost $12.

Moves Like Sheep

When I was asked to help provide movement and choreography for some of the animal characters in the upcoming show, Babe the Sheep Pig, I couldn’t contain my excitement.  I would finally have the opportunity to explore how a farm animal like a pig or sheep might express emotions through movement that could range from despair to jubilation.
Perhaps that sounds silly, but actors rely on much more than just their voice to portray characters.  Even with different human characters there is a wide “vocabulary” of movements that may be used in characterization.  For example, introverted characters might use subtle gestures, while the most powerful characters take up the most space.  A character’s walk is in many ways just as important as their lines.

Translating these concepts to characters from the animal kingdom proves to be a unique and thrilling challenge.   I thought it might be insightful for the audience to share my thought processes for developing this “vocabulary” of movement that is going into portraying these delightful bestial characters.

Take the sheep, for example. They are mostly calm and placid and they desperately want to stay in their herd. They are almost unmoving statues when standing together in a close knot.  When presented with a threat that could be dangerous, they move away.  First slowly and then at a full run if the threat gets too close.  Sheepdogs use this behavior to their advantage to drive herds of sheep from pasture to barn.

The sheepdogs  are the monarchs of the farmyard.  They are full of energy, their eyes darting from place to place always looking to keep the livestock in line and be helpful to their masters.  Dogs have a unique canine smile and carry their heads high in pride, particularly when they are hard at work.

Finally, the character of Babe is a unique challenge.  The character has a porcine gait, but the pig’s circumstances change dramatically through the story.  How does a pig look when it is sad? Does a pig trot differently when it is really trying hard? How does a pig show the uncertainty of fear or the thrill of victory?  You’ll have to come to the show to see for yourself. As you watch, be sure to think about all the hard work the actors put into imbuing these animal characters with movements that identify them as the animals they portray, while delivering their lines and exercising their craft.

Andrew Smith
Choreographer

Top 10 Best Moments of DreamWrights 2016

As we countdown the days to 2017, our twentieth year, we take a moment to relish our accomplishments and great memories from 2016.

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10. Our transition from a Youth and Family Theatre to a Center for Community Arts

In March we began to transition our identity from a Youth and Family Theatre to a Center Community Arts. Building characters for life became our mantra while putting growth center stage was identified as the inspiration behind our capital campaign. As a Center for Community Arts, a new Innovative Programming Committee was formed and wasted no time sponsoring DreamWrights’ first Open Mic Night. Budding comedians, talented musicians, and a friendly faced magician graced the stage of our relaxed and casual space. We had so much fun we are planning to do it again soon!

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Zombies in the elevator at DreamFrights

9. New camp and event programming

This year, DreamWrights offered a wider array of art and performance based camps as well as a few new events. Our first ever DreamFrights Haunted House was a huge success! With different fright levels, we were able to entertain young ones up through older kids and adults who enjoy the thrill of the scare. We hosted a tea parties during the runs of The Secret Garden and The Adventures of Peter Rabbit and we had cookies, cocoa, and caroling with Santa, Dorothy, and the Wizard in Oz earlier this month. Flippin’ Broadway, a cabaret of Broadway show tunes with a fun twist, was a crowd pleaser in February.

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As for summer camps, this year we offered 24 different exciting and creative camps. These included three Disney performance camps, 101 Dalmatians, Cinderella, and Aladdin. We also held art camps taught by local artists Rita Whitney and Karen Paust, a digital photography camp taught by Randy Flaum of White Rose Community TV, and a poetry class taught by York’s poet laureate, Christine Lincoln. We are planning equally innovative, clever, and exciting camps and classes again this coming summer. Spread the word and tell your friends!

8. Our beautifully designed sets

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The Secret Garden

This year, DreamWrights raised the bar with our set design by employing the talents of some amazing designers and builders. Fifteen year old first time set designer, Jacob Schlenker, gave a beautiful and sassy makeover to the set of Legally Blonde. The first ever DreamWrights raked (sloped) stage was designed by Billy Ferrell for The Adventures of Peter RabbitAllen Brenner brought us a beautiful two story set staged in alley configuration with the audience on two sides for The Secret Garden. Most recently, the illustrious Ray Olewiler designed a magical set that was over the rainbow.

7. The enthusiasm and energy that Guest Directors bring

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Guest Directors Andrea Unger and Chris Quigley

This year, DreamWrights benefited from the expertise of five guest directors: Andrea Unger (Our Miss Brooks and The Adventures of Peter Rabbit), Nic Ecker (Legally Blonde), Michelle Denise Norton (As You Like It), Kirk Wisler (The Beverly Hillbillies), and Jaci Keagy (The Wizard of Oz). In anticipation of the upcoming season, where we will be using six guest directors and three guest assistant directors, a formalized guest director process was introduced. The first introduction and kickoff meeting for guest directors was held in early December. Please join us in welcoming Guest Directors Rodd Robertson (directing Pride and Prejudice), Andrea Unger (Peter Pan and Mary), Michelle Denise Norton (The Taming of the Shrew), Timothy Storey (The Mousetrap), Chris Quigley (Disney’s Beauty and the Beast), and Jaci Keagy (It’s a Wonderful Life) as well as Guest Assistant Directors Amanda Nowell, Kevin Alvarnaz, and Andrea Unger. We hope that our improved processes for these guest directors will make for an even better experience for our crews, casts, and audiences!

6. Our community celebration to kick off our capital campaign

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On June 30, to kick off the public phase of our capital campaign, we threw open wide our doors and invited the local community to meet our refreshed Center for Community Arts. Nearly 200 friendly faces joined us in the celebration. This exciting event featured performers and artists that included: YWCA’s Temple Guard Drill Team, Devix, Kingsfoil, Weary Arts Group, First Capital Drumline, Illstyle & Peace presented by Positive Energy Arts Foundation, and DreamWrights’ own Theatre Under the Trees and StAGEs troupes.

 

5. Our StAGEs program winning a Nonprofit Innovation Award

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In February, DreamWrights was awarded a Nonprofit Innovation Award in the category of collaboration with StARTSomething by the Central Penn Business Journal for our work with StAGES, our creative improv class for folks 55 and older. StAGEs encourage active participation in the performing arts. Thanks to additional support from the Cultural Alliance Creative Impact Award, this year our StAGEs troupe has made new friends, new memories, and has had tons of laughs while enjoying the benefits of “creative aging.”

4. A successful internal transition

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This year we honored the career of founding member, Diane Crews, and we welcomed Hilary Adams, our new Director of Artistic Programming. Diane’s DreamWrights career was memorialized in the naming of our black box theatre. Hilary has hit the ground running as she is currently finalizing the crews and casts of her first DreamWrights production, Babe, the Sheep-Pig.

3. Being on TV and performing to sold out crowds

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We ended the year with a bang as we enjoyed our 4 minutes of fame on Fox 43‘s morning show on December 1. It was a great way to kick off our run of The Wizard of Oz as nearly every show was sold out. Our hearts, minds, and confidence was renewed as we remember that there’s no place like home – or your second home – as many of you call this place known as DreamWrights.

2. Community support of our capital campaign

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Executive Director, Ann Davis, with Mayor Kim Bracey and York City Solicitor and DW Board Member, Jason Sabol at Hats at the Hound fundraiser event

What began as a dream took a foothold in reality this year with the funds we have raised towards our capital campaign. We brought our message to the broader community through fundraising events like Hats at the Hound. Although we have not met our goal of $2.5 million dollars, we are standing strong at $1.8 million with phased construction plans and approvals from the appropriate local municipalities to begin moving forward with our construction this spring. We are excited for the opportunities the future holds with the new studio space, upgraded building enhancements, and expanded programming. We have received some amazing support from businesses and individuals alike. We thank you for your support. If you have not done so already, we graciously ask you to consider helping us get closer to our goal.

1. You walking through our doors

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Your involvement is what makes DreamWrights the amazing community it is. People of all ages, from all backgrounds and experiences are welcome to safely explore the arts, try new things, and be part of something bigger than themselves. DreamWrights builds characters for life. We look forward to working together with you again in the coming year to create our best, brightest, and biggest year yet!

Happy New Year from DreamWrights!

Thankful

This Thanksgiving, we pause to recognize many of the great things that make us thankful.

We are thankful for our Board of Directors that steers our non-profit company, navigating regulations, scooping up opportunity, and setting a course for success and longevity.

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We are thankful for our DreamWrights community. When we come together, we are so much more than the sum of our parts. It is you who makes DreamWrights so special. We are proud to call you family.

We are thankful for our tireless volunteers. You are the heart and soul of DreamWrights. We sincerely appreciate all of your time, effort, and enthusiasm.

We are thankful for our founding members who built DreamWrights’ strong foundational pillars, encouraging personal growth, inclusivity, and making DreamWrights a safe place to try new things and discover new interests and talents.

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We are thankful for our members. We greatly appreciate your ongoing support and vote of confidence.

We are thankful to those who make monetary and in-kind donations of all sizes and shapes. Among other things, we are happy to have lights, heat, and licensed scripts to keep our day-to-day operations running.

We are thankful to the larger York art community. We are inspired by your courageous participation in the arts and proud to be a part of this circle.

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We are thankful for our capital campaign donors. Without you, DreamWrights would not continue to grow, be relevant, draw new participants and audiences, and serve our community.

We are thankful for the opportunity to stage such a magically iconic musical, The Wizard of Oz, this holiday season. We appreciate the time and effort put forth by the crews and casts of this show, all working as a team to present our best show yet.

Critter Crew

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Bethany Mortorff (seated center) surrounded by the Critter Crew.

Have you seen the adorable handmade critters that are for sale at DreamWrights during the shows? They are created under the direction of Bethany Mortorff. You might say she heads up the DreamWrights “Critter Crew.”

It all began when she joined the costume crew in spring of 2015 for Tom Sawyer Sings. She remembers, “Rebecca [Eastman] taught me to sew and at the end of the show I made some of the turtle patterns she had. I just assumed making critters was something she did for every show so when I came back for the next show, I said, ‘What are we going to make’ and she said, ‘I don’t know.’”

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That’s when Bethany began designing concepts and patterns for critters beyond turtles. She started making mouse patterns and crafting cute stuffed mice but when she realized there weren’t going to be lobby sales for The Mouse that Roared, she started designing for Seussical. It took off from there.

For Seussical she made elephants and giraffes and other characters that were in the show. “I just started experimenting and making things up.” The popularity of the Seussical critters caught on quickly. They completely sold out in the first several days.

Bethany expects the critters she’s currently making for The Wizard of Oz to sell quickly as well. “I started designing the patterns months ago because I knew this show was coming. I’ve been trying to have them ready to go so that when the show came along it would be easier to make them.”

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Many of the patterns are her own, including the popular Ozian tree which has gotten a lot of attention and interest from the cast and crew. Bethany explains, “I wasn’t planning to make trees until they had people show up and get cast as trees then decide they didn’t want to be a tree and dropped out. I thought, for the people who are excited to be a tree, I’m going to make them a tree! And they got popular!”

Participating for the first time at DreamWrights, Andrea Mariano has found her way onto Bethany’s Critter Crew. Her three kids Julianna, Mason, and Taryn hold positions on the costume, lights, and props crews respectively (10 year old Mason will be operating the follow spot!). After dropping her kids off, Andrea decided to stick around and help out. She laughs, “Last week I showed up and Bob [McCleary] handed me a power drill. I had high heeled boots on. So now I just sneak up the back to the costume shop.” She says she feels more at home with scissors and fabric than with power tools and wood.

Although Bethany has made a big impact in the costume shop, she’s been on stage twice: Anne of Green Gables and The Adventures of Peter Rabbit. She says with a chuckle, “Every now and then they let me out of the costume shop but mostly I reside somewhere up here.”

Be sure to check out the Critter Crew’s creations for sale in the lobby before, during, and after The Wizard of Oz shows. Prices range from $5 – $25 each, while supplies last.

Announcing our 2017 Season Lineup and 20th Year Milestone

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Not only does 2017 offer what promises to be a highly entertaining year of theatrical programming for DreamWrights Center for Community Arts, but also marks the theatre’s 20th year anniversary. “2017 will be an exciting year for us at DreamWrights,” comments Ann Davis, DreamWrights’ Executive Director. “Especially for those of us who are founding members and have been involved since the beginning, it is great to see the organization grow and develop. Since the beginning, DreamWrights has been offering educational and mentorship opportunities across multiple generations, while constantly strengthening our reach and impact on the greater York community. The 2017 season is well positioned to continue this growth.”

With shows from Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, to Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap, to the musical The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Hilary Adams, Director of Artistic Programming, says that this season will provide opportunities behind the scenes or on the stage for the seasoned DreamWrights participant as well as those thinking about trying something new. Adams explains, “We have comedies, dramas, and musicals. We have classic and modern text. On the technical side, we will be creating a diverse variety of theatrical worlds. We look forward to engaging the community and welcoming people to DreamWrights.”

This season, DreamWrights is proud to stage a world premiere by local playwright, Paige Hoke, Peter Pan and Mary or, the Girl Who Would Not Be a Lady, a prequel to J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan or, the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up. For anyone familiar with Hoke or her work, this anticipated event promises to be popular for crew, cast, and audiences alike.

In addition, the 2017 season brings to life theatrical adaptations of books and films, including Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, family favorite, Babe the Sheep-Pig, and holiday staple, It’s a Wonderful Life. Adams reports, “In terms of education, adaptations provide an opportunity to experience a story in different forms. You could see the stage version first then work backwards, for example, watching the movie then reading the book, and then compare and contrast the differences between the various art forms.” She suggests this season provides plenty of inspiration for launching a reading club. “These adaptations would be fun to read and study. It would an excellent educational opportunity to look at an age appropriate theatrical adaptation, ask questions about the differences in the forms of the story, and then play with adapting a scene from the book or film to the stage.”

For summer time programming, DreamWrights’ Theatre Under the Trees brings Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew free to York County parks. Since 1998, Theatre Under the Trees has provided classic Shakespeare with a modern twist to fans and families.

DreamWrights 2017 season kicks off with Babe, the Sheep-Pig which runs February 10 – 26, followed by Pride and Prejudice (March 30 – April 1), Peter Pan and Wendy or, The Girl Who Would Not Be a Lady (May 5 – 21), The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (June 22 – 25), The Taming Of the Shrew (July 21 – 29), The Mousetrap (August 11 – 20), Disney’s Beauty and the Beast (October 6 – 22) and It’s a Wonderful Life (Dec 1 – 17). For further information or to purchase tickets, please visit www.dreamwrights.org.

Find the Hidden “Easter Eggs”

l to r: Noah Youcheff and Randy Riley rehearse a scene for 'The Adventures of Peter Rabbit'
l to r: Noah Youcheff and Randy Riley

The Adventures of Peter Rabbit opens at DreamWrights Center for Community Arts with some hidden surprises for the audience to discover. These “Easter eggs” help to knit the scenes together, adding another layer to the story. This is an aspect of the show that really excites Guest Director, Andrea Unger. “In our production meetings, we’ve discussed visuals and sounds that tie Beatrix Potter’s real life – reality – to her imagination – her stories. For instance, the jacket that Peter Rabbit wears is the same jacket that Noel Moore, the boy for whom Peter Rabbit was written, also wears. This particular production offered many opportunities for this extra layering. Not everyone in the audience will consciously notice these subtle details. Hopefully, those who do will find as much delight in discovering them as we did in making them.”

Sarah Byers, foreground, plays the writer Beatrix Potter, with a group of characters she created in the background, in production of 'The Adventures of Peter Rabbit'
Sarah Byers, foreground, plays the writer Beatrix Potter, with a group of characters she created in the background

Unger admits that at first she was unsure about directing this production because she thought the play was about Peter Rabbit. But then she read the script and realized she was mistaken. Unger explains, “I was captured by the depth of the story, which is actually more about Beatrix Potter, the author of the Peter Rabbit stories. The play portrays her life, and how some of her stories came to be, in an imaginative and playful narration.” Unger says the storyline moves quickly enough to keep the attention of younger children while being complex enough to keep the attention of adults, too. “You will learn something and you will laugh. And the mice are just so darned cute!”

DreamWrights is offering the chance to enjoy tea and confections with Beatrix Potter and Peter Rabbit on Saturday, October 22 from 1:00 – 2:00pm. The tea is open to all ages and attendees are encouraged to wear their garden party finery. The cost for the tea is $10 per person. Stay for the 2:30pm matinee and save $3. Tickets for the tea are available through Oct. 21 at 4:00pm.

l to r: Dana Cutti, Lilly Einsig and Jonah Unger rehearse a scene for 'The Adventures of Peter Rabbit'
l to r: Dana Cutti, Lilly Einsig and Jonah Unger

The Adventures of Peter Rabbit and its delightful surprises opens Friday, October 7 and runs October 7, 8, 14, 15, 21 and 22 at 6:30pm and October 8, 9, 15, 16, 22 and 23 at 2:30pm. Tickets may be purchased online at www.dreamwrights.org or by calling 717-848-8623. Seats cost $10 for general, $14 for reserved.

Adults and Teens Take the Spotlight in The Beverly Hillbillies

'The Berverly Hillbillies' archive view

This summer, many adults and teens are taking the stage at DreamWrights’ production of The Beverly Hillbillies. There a few parts for younger actors, but primarily the show calls for an older cast. DreamWrights Guest Director, Kirk Wisler, is excited about this nuance, “It’s cool because Mom and Dad are really getting some time in the spotlight.”

A handful of these participants are new to DreamWrights. This might be the first time audiences will meet them. Kirk laughs, “The cast is doing such a good job getting into character, that I think they will be remembered as their character more than their actual identities. Hopefully this show will be talked about and looked back on for many years.”

'The Berverly Hillbillies' archive view

Humor is a large part of what makes this production appealing. Kirk explains, “I was attracted to this show because of the comedy aspect to it. It’s so much fun to block a show and add in your personal comedic taste. This show is very familiar to audiences, which builds the anticipation to see it!” Kirk is aware of the challenge the familiarity presents to him as a director. “Audience members have an idea in their head of each character and how the story should go. So it’s my job to make sure we live up to their expectations, while at the same time giving them something that they haven’t seen before.”

Kirk, the cast, and the crew are having a lot of fun staging the show and they hope audiences are equally entertained. It is Kirk’s hope that participants and audience members alike can forget about all the seriousness and negativity in the world today and instead, can enjoy themselves for a couple of hours. “Maybe that can carry over into the rest of their week or summer,” wishes Kirk.

'The Berverly Hillbillies' archive view

Director Kirk Wisler started at DreamWrights when he was in 4th grade acting, stage managing, and later coordinating stage combat scenes. He directed his first production, The Mouse that Roared, last summer and had such a good time that he is returning this summer to direct The Beverly Hillbillies.

The Beverly Hillbillies opens Friday, August 12 at 6:30pm and runs August 13, 19, 20 at 6:30pm and August 13, 14, 20, 21 at 2:30pm. Tickets may be purchased online at www.dreamwrights.org or by calling 717-848-8623. Seats cost $10 for general, $14 for reserved.